Accueil / Home

  ACTMD - Association Canadienne des thérapeutes en Médecines Douces
CATCM - Canadian Association of Therapists in Complementary Medicine

ACDM - Association Canadienne des Massothérapeutes  et Autres thérapeutes en Médecines Alternatives

Accueil / Home

 

 

 

Article du mois
Article of the month

 

 

TOUCH SEEN BY A SHRINK
by Francine Audet M.A., translated by CATCM's team

We all know now, thanks to Ashley Montagu* that the early tactile experiment or its absence affects the development of the behavior.   Harlow's experiment, which also had the purpose to understand the importance of the physical proximity and the touch, even showed us that it is vital.   In its experiment, young monkeys private of the contact with their " mother" or of a substitute let themselves die. James L.   Halliday, in its book of psychosocial medicine, announces similar behavior at the human baby:   " the babies private of the usual contact of the body of their mother develop a major depressive state accompanied by a loss of appetite, a loss of weight which can even result in death "  

Since 1921 the anatomist Harnett put to us on this track by the publication of an article mentioning the following discovery:   softness supports a calm and flexible behavior in the animals whereas the absence of attentive care makes timorous and irritable.  

By the touch, one feels something of the hand but also inside oneself, here where that challenges the shrink!   Certain people consult a massage therapist rather than a psychotherapist because they anticipate what are the requirements to work in therapy and are not ready to do so.   They have however the intelligence to take care of themselves in other way, while meeting a very significant basic need.  

By your care, they receive a professional, alleviating, releasing and " nutritive" touch for the spirit (they are feeling better inside).   It is not the characteristic of the baby to have need for this " emotional food" but a the human one.  

With the passing of years of professional practice try not to lose sight of the importance of the care given with your hands because it is specifically for this care that your customers consult you.

* Montagu Ashley, La peau et le toucher, éd. du Seuil, 1979, 219 pages

Francine Audet is psychologiste
For more information: (450) 444-7988
www.FrancineAudet.com

 

 

 

 

© Copyright ACTMD